Nothing Is Truer than Truth

6 Comments

  1. Conrad DiDiodato
    Conrad DiDiodato December 18, 2010 at 2:55 pm .

    Chris,<br /><br />what a gold mine of Shakespeare authorship information.<br /><br />Thank you!

  2. Chris Lott
    Chris Lott December 18, 2010 at 7:30 am .

    Sanity? Yes, by all means: <a href="http://shakespeareauthorship.com/&quot; rel="nofollow">http://shakespeareauthorship.com/</a&gt;

  3. Joseph Hutchison
    Joseph Hutchison November 30, 2010 at 6:17 am .

    Well, either the author matters or he (or she) does not. The controversy exists because the evidence for the Stratford man is extremely scanty, obscure, inconsistent, and unconvincing, and because the biography of de Vere aligns so well with the character of the works. This all assumes that works, in some fundamental way, reflect the nature and experience of their authors. It is ridiculous to

  4. Conrad DiDiodato
    Conrad DiDiodato November 30, 2010 at 1:00 am .

    Joseph,<br /><br />the search for the &#39;empirical&#39; Shakespeare is an interesting sort of request. It almost makes the historical Shakespeare a battleground between two sorts of believers: the community of Shakespeare readers and students (such as myself)who&#39;ve carried the canon to this point and this other suppressed (or oppressed?)voice of power and prestige that I&#39;m tempted to

  5. Joseph Hutchison
    Joseph Hutchison November 30, 2010 at 12:14 am .

    My friend Nigg agrees with you. But my point is not that the man from Stratford is an impossible author, only that there is no evidence whatsoever that he was. Oxford, at least, was well known as a poet and playwright; he was a patron of acting companies; and his biography aligns with much of the special knowledge &quot;Shakespeare&quot; clearly acquired somehow. There are plenty of Shakespeare

  6. Conrad DiDiodato
    Conrad DiDiodato November 29, 2010 at 11:13 pm .

    Hi Joseph<br /><br />I&#39;m afraid I&#39;m going to have to disagree with the de Veere-is-Shakespeare thesis. I find the argument both incomprehensible and a bit snobbish. It&#39;s always struck me as the &quot;Da Vinci Code&quot; of Shakespeare studies.<br /><br />I can&#39;t say I know more about Shakespeare than the obligatory Collected Plays of Shakespeare course I had to take for my

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