In Praise of Intention

5 Comments

  1. Joseph Hutchison
    Joseph Hutchison July 20, 2010 at 9:34 pm .

    My brother &amp; his family live in Eugene, as did my Mom until she passed away recently. A beautiful town, with magnificently poet-friendly used book stores. It <i>is</i> nestled amid farmland, much of it given over to seed grass. Hence your suffering, Joel! And Vassilis, there you are in Greece—too far to travel for used books! Glad I could provide you both with a train of thought to ride there

  2. jejacobson
    jejacobson July 20, 2010 at 3:00 pm .

    I&#39;ve only been to Eugene once…for my sister&#39;s college graduation. I&#39;m allergic to grass, and Eugene was (still is?) known as the grass capital of the world. Within 24 hours my eyes and nasal passages had swollen almost completely shut. <br /><br />With that said, this is a fantastic, thought-provoking post. Because of the direct connection between consciousness, patience, and poetry

  3. vazambam
    vazambam July 20, 2010 at 9:07 am .

    Joe,<br /><br />Even though I&#39;ve never been to Eugene and it really doesn&#39;t matter one way or the other, I have to say this post was real educational trip–thanks for taking me along!

  4. Joseph Hutchison
    Joseph Hutchison July 20, 2010 at 12:51 am .

    Somewhere recently I read an <a href="http://afilreis.blogspot.com/2010/07/you-dont-have-to-like-everybody-anymore.html&quot; rel="nofollow">excerpt of an interview with Marjorie Perloff</a> in which she admitted that, as much as she has written about Stevens, she never really developed an excitement about his work. A side-effect of professionalism, I guess. It&#39;s one of my objections to poetic

  5. Conrad DiDiodato
    Conrad DiDiodato July 19, 2010 at 2:22 pm .

    Well said, Joseph!<br /><br />&quot;So a poem is not a machine, really, but a relationship. A relationship of two intentionalities: a giver and a receiver, both of whom come to the poem to experience a moment in the becoming of consciousness.&quot;<br /><br />The poem is relevant to the reader or it isn&#39;t, whatever the intention or literary affiliation: the same criterion by which I choose my

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